In Association with Amazon.com




This store is brought to you in association with Amazon.com. Click on any of the products below to view the large image or purchase the item at Amazon.com. Is there a book you've really enjoyed lately? Email a recommendation and/or a review to
Book_Review@bachorgan.com and we may post it here.


Page: Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next                     Home page

cover

Organists Manual: Technical Studies and Selected Compositions for the Organ by Roger E. Davis. Hardcover - 209 pages (September 1985)

Reviewer: A reader
My teacher uses this book faithfully for organ instruction and after using it in lessons I can see why: it contains basic exercises for warming up and achieving finger coordination and dexterity. It also contains some of the best organ pieces that a person of any experience can play to increase his or her technique. A must have for teachers and students.

No cover
image

Ornamentation in Baroque and Post-Baroque Music, with Special Emphasis on J.S. Bach by Frederick Neumann. Paperback - 648 pages, Reprint edition (December 1, 1983)

Reviewer: McIrvine@Ix.Netcom.Com from New York
Books concerning performance practice are by their very nature controversial, and we can't ask Bach, Handel, or Telemann what they actually meant when they used a short-hand symbol or expected a performer to improvise a decoration. Or can we? Professor Neumann has compiled a volume based on writings in the Baroque era that attempts (successfully in my opinion) to provide some clues to the sketchy musical notations of busy and prolific composers in the Baroque era. His ideas are indeed controversial, but I think that they are well-reasoned and often brilliant. His knowledge of sources in the Baroque is magnificent, and his arguments are keenly-reasoned. This is a book of somewhat limited readership. Performers and scholars who play or edit Baroque music will find this to be a useful reference with a strong idex, a good bibliography, and a helpful guide to solving questions of decoration. Those who don't have an active involvement with Baroque music will find the book cryptic.

No cover
image

Partita No. 1 in B Minor by J.S. Bach, Laurindo Almeida. Paperback (October 31, 2000)

No cover
image

Registration of J. S. Bach's Organ Works by Thomas Harmon. Hardcover (June 1978)

No cover
image

Registration of J. S. Bach's Organ Works by Thomas Harmon. Paperback (June 1978)

No cover
image

Short Preludes and Fugues for Piano by J.S. Bach. Paperback (June 1914)

No cover
image

Sonata No. 3 by Laurindo Almeida, J.S. Bach. Paperback (October 30, 2000)

cover

St. John Passion in Full Score by Johann Sebastian Bach. Paperback - 160 pages (November 1993)

cover

St. Matthew Passion, Bwv 232, in Full Score by Johann Sebastian Bach. Paperback - 304 pages (May 1999)

Reviewer: Christopher Rosevear from Hampshire, UK
Of course you must have a full score of the St Matthew. But beware: while some more recent editions have made it readable to the modern amateur musician, this edition still uses clefs you might find difficult: the soprano clef, the tenor (not viola) clef ... and the clarity of printing leaves something to be desired. However, all the notes are there and much more legible than a pocket score.

cover

Step by Step: J.S. Bach, 20 Piano Pieces by Johann Sebastian Bach. Paperback (March 2000)

No cover
image

The Aeolian Pipe Organ & Its Music by Rollin Smith. Hardcover (September 1998)

No cover
image

The Art of Organ Building (Volume 2 of 2) by George Ashdown Audsley, Drew A. Hyland. Paperback, reprint edition, Vol 002 (October 1990)

Reviewer: A reader
This book has almost every thing about pipe organs. Fun and enjoyable to read. The Windchests part was very well explained.

cover

The Cambridge Companion to Bach (Cambridge Companions to Music) by John Butt (Editor) Paperback - 324 pages (June 1997)

Editorial Reviews: Amazon.com
Fifteen varied essays by 11 authors provide a thoughtful, broad introduction to the music and person of Johann Sebastian Bach. The Cambridge Companion is divided into three main sections: the first concentrates on the biographical and historical details of Bach's life; the second aims at a general discussion of the music; and the last evaluates Bach's continuing influence on modern music. Representative topics in each section include a recounting of Bach's position as a supporter of monarchical absolutism ("Bach and the Domestic Politics of Electoral Saxony"), a discussion of scholarship throwing light on the authenticity of some of the early works ("The Early Works and the Heritage of the Seventeenth Century"), and an outline of developments in performance practice of Bach's music from his time to ours ("Changing Issues of Performance Practice"). The book provides valuable background material for those who may have casually encountered and enjoyed Bach's music, and the variety of viewpoints helps readers avoid an oversimplified impression of the great composer.

cover

The Cambridge Companion to the Organ (Cambridge Companions to Music) by Nicholas Thistlethwaite (Editor), Geoffrey Webber (Editor). Paperback - 325 pages (March 1999)

An essential guide to all aspects of the organ and its music--from the history of the instrument to the practical art of learning and playing it to the vast repertoire of organ music. 31 photos. 70 music examples.

cover

The Essential Bach Choir by Andrew Parrott. Paperback - 150 pages (July 2000)

Reviewer: A reader from Toronto, Canada
Andrew Parrott's wonderful volume is the culmination of many years study and practical application of J. S. Bach performance practice. Many of the conclusions are not new, but follow from the work of Josua Rifkin, made more compelling with easily grasped, definitive scholarship. It is past time for the modern choirmaster and music director to seriously reconsider those grand scale performances, and hear Bach anew, intimate, expressive, and no less powerful.

cover

The History of the English Organ by Stephen Bicknell. Paperback - 433 pages (March 1, 1999)

This highly readable and lavishly illustrated work describes the history of organs built in England from AD 900 to the present day. The author's experience in organ building gives the account all the benefits of first-hand experience. Stephen Bicknell also draws on new research and includes many important discoveries made during the past twenty years. Written in an elegant, entertaining and informed manner, the book is a vital and much-needed addition to current organ literature.

No cover
image

The History of the Organ in the United by Orpha Caroline Ochse. Paperback - 512 pages, Reprint edition (February 1989)

Reviewer: A reader from Nyack, NY United States
This book gives a detailed description of the organ history in the US. There were a lot of facts that I haven't heard of before (like the German organ-building tradition through the Moravian Brothers). But do not expect glossy color prints in this book; it is - in the reviewer's opinion - not for the organ enthusiast's coffee table, it is a well-written reference.

No cover
image

The Joy of Organ Music by Kenneth Baker. Paperback - 80 pages (January 1979)

cover

The Language of the Classical French Organ: A Musical Tradition Before 1800 by Fenner Douglass. Paperback - 251 pages, New&Expnd edition (September 1995)

This authoritative study of the French classical organ is a major source for the interpretation of early French organ music. For this new edition, the author has added a chapter on touch in early French organs and its importance for practice. The bibliography has also been extensively revised.

No cover
image

The Lost Tradition in Music: Rhythm and Tempo in J. S. Bach's Time (Encore Music Editions) by Fritz Rothchild. Hardcover (June 1979)

Page: Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next                     Home page

Search:
Keywords:
In Association with Amazon.com